Age 64 – Start Your Medicare

As you get closer to age 65, you’ll want to narrow down your potential Medicare options so you can find the right plan for you.

While you’re eligible for benefits when you turn 65, you can begin enrolling in Medicare 3 months before your 65th birthday. So now is the perfect time to finalize your choices and pick the Medicare plan that fits your life.

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Florida Blue Medicare Plans

Florida Blue has proudly served Medicare beneficiaries since 1965. We offer a variety of affordable Medicare plans with more benefits than Original Medicare. Choose a plan that's right for you with coverage options like access to a trusted network of doctors, hospitals and pharmacies, cost-saving programs and more.

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Medicare Advantage (Part C)

All-in-one plans with $0 premiums, broad provider network, prescription drug, dental, vision, hearing benefits, savings programs, SilverSneakers®, and more.

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Prescription Drug (Part D)

Stand-alone Rx coverage with a nationwide pharmacy network, home delivery and savings programs.

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Medicare Supplement (Medigap)

Plans that help pay out-of-pocket costs not covered by Original Medicare offering savings programs, automatic claim filing and a 30-day money back guarantee.

Working Past 65 – You Have Options

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Continuing to work past 65 doesn’t necessarily mean you should delay your Medicare enrollment. If you have health insurance with an employer, a Medicare plan could work with your coverage and even provide coverage for services that your employer’s plan doesn’t cover.

Even if you’re still working, you may want to consider enrolling in Medicare Part A. For most people, Part A does not charge a Premium. You’ll want to make sure that your existing coverage won’t change if you enroll in Part A. If you are required to pay a premium for Part A and don’t sign up during your Initial Enrollment Period, your monthly premium may increase by 10%. This could mean you will have a higher premium for twice the amount of time you didn’t sign up for Part A. If you were eligible for Part A for 2 years but didn’t sign up, you’ll have to pay the higher premium for 4 years.

Your options for Medicare Part B enrollment vary depending on the size of your employer. Generally, if your employer has fewer than 20 employees, Medicare will be your primary insurance. So, you may need to enroll in Medicare Part B during your Initial Enrollment Period. But if your employer has 20 or more employees, your employer’s group health plan will be your primary insurer. This means you may have more options, including delaying enrollment or having both your employer coverage and Medicare.

Check with your human resources department to see if you should consider signing up for Parts A and B in addition to the coverage you get today.

Important Facts About Working Past 65 and Medicare

  • You can enroll in Medicare and still work full-time, which means you can have employer health coverage and Medicare at the same time. One will act as your primary insurance and the other as secondary. 

  • Signing up for Medicare, even if it’s just Part A, could keep you from being able to make contributions to a health savings account (HSA) tied to a high-deductible health plan through your employer.

  • When you lose coverage, you will have a Special Enrollment Period for Medicare that lasts 8 months. You may enroll in Parts A and/or B during this entire period but can only enroll in Parts C and/or D during the first two months.

  • If you become eligible for COBRA after you enroll in Medicare Parts A and B, you have the option to have COBRA, in addition to Medicare, as your primary coverage.

  • You can enroll in Medicare and still work full-time, which means you can have employer health coverage and Medicare at the same time. One will act as your primary insurance and the other as secondary. 

  • Signing up for Medicare, even if it’s just Part A, could keep you from being able to make contributions to a health savings account (HSA) tied to a high-deductible health plan through your employer.

  • When you lose coverage, you will have a Special Enrollment Period for Medicare that lasts 8 months. You may enroll in Parts A and/or B during this entire period but can only enroll in Parts C and/or D during the first two months.

  • If you become eligible for COBRA after you enroll in Medicare Parts A and B, you have the option to have COBRA, in addition to Medicare, as your primary coverage.

Medicare Planning Checklist

Medicare Planning Checklist

Florida Blue provides a checklist with the steps you need to get started with Medicare as you approach age 65.

Get ready for Medicare

Get Ready for Medicare

U.S. government handbook explaining important decisions you need to make before Medicare coverage starts.

Shop for Medicare plans in your area

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FBM PLN 003 F 082021
Last Updated: 10.01.2021
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